I have a friend of mine who labels himself as a vegetarian, but he occasionally eats meat. He also doesn't mind eating beans made with bacon. He says things like, "oh well Sara's a better vegetarian than I am." I don't know how to break it to him, that you can't be a, "Better," vegetarian. It's just you are or your aren't. No one is perfect. And I've accidentally eaten some food with animal product in it with out even realizing it. But I've never ordered a meat pizza for instance. I have no way to break it to this person that he's just not a vegetarian. Or maybe I'm wrong let me know what you think. My friends will justify his logic by saying, "oh well there's just different definitions of vegetarian," but not to me. What do you think? Is my friend a vegetarian? How do I respond to this situation? Do I just keep my mouth shut?  

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No meat eater can be a vegetarian!.

If you ask me, it depends on your motives for becoming vegetarian.

I don't eat meat because I don't want to support the meat industry. I don't think that it's generally wrong to eat meat (humans are omnivores, thats in our nature), but I don't like what has become of our modern meat culture. People eat meat everyday and think it's normal, but it shouldn't be. And, well, I don't have to talk about the meat industry (and their impact on the keeping of the animals as well as on our health)...

For round about 360 days a year I'm a Vegetarian but sometimes, when I'm really really sure where the meat is from and it's a special occasion, I do eat meat (or fish).


AND I still consider myself a Vegetarian. Why? Because I feel like one. I hate that kind of stereotype thinking that draws a line between people (whether I'm an Lacto-Ovo-Vegetarian or just an Ovo-Vegetarian... who cares?). Everyone should be what he or she feels good and comfortable with and shouldn't try to be something else just to fit a definition...


But then again, if you are a Vegetarian just because you think it's wrong to eat/harm/kill animals then I get where you're coming from. If you think like that and still sometimes eat meat, you're just a friggin hypocrite.

I really agree with Janna Reick's last comment, it describes how the bond between our food and ourselves has been broken. For a bushman in Cameroun, eating meat is an act of survival. For an inuit in the Great North, eating meat is a strong cultural heritage. The bond between the two is hunting. If you hunt for survival, or if you farm your own food, you do not view an animal, or even a cob of corn the way today's city folks see animals or food: you understand the process, the sacrifice of killing an animal for your own survival, you value that bond. But when you see animals as commodity and manage them for a profit, the equilibrium is completely broken. That's why it is so important that I be a vegetarian: because I live in a context where hunting is useless and if everybody started hunting what lived around them there wouldn't be any wildlife left in only a few months. The way the meat industry is managed today is totally against my environmental and social beliefs. And knowing you can survive without killing any animal being is not sacrificing your habits: it is making a commitment to the beauty of this world and making sure the people and animals that come after you may experience the quality of life that was handed out to you. Being a vegetarian, whatever kind of vegetarian, just makes sense.

Janna I agree. If you want to eat meat once or twice a year and call yourself a vegetarian than thats A-Okay! There are 365 days a year and if your a veggie 363 than kudos to you. Personally I am offended by label loving vegetarians/vegans saying you are anything but what you identify with.

 

 

I would call your friend a flexitarian.  I am 100% vegan at home and when I pack my lunch, but occasionally someone will cook something with cheese and I'll give it a try.  The same goes with fish, I don't buy it or cook it, but once in awhile I'll have a taste at a friend's who cooked up some fresh fish.  So, I don't call myself a vegan, I'm a flexitarian.

I also don't buy anymore leather products, but not throwing out my birkenstock collection. :-)  That's not vegan either.

I would call your friend a flexitarian.  I am 100% vegan at home and when I pack my lunch, but occasionally someone will cook something with cheese and I'll give it a try.  The same goes with fish, I don't buy it or cook it, but once in awhile I'll have a taste at a friend's who cooked up some fresh fish.  So, I don't call myself a vegan, I'm a flexitarian.

I also don't buy anymore leather products, but not throwing out my birkenstock collection. :-)  That's not vegan either.

There was a debate a while ago about if you're vegan should you give away your leather goods or not. Some things have sentimental value, I think as long as you are making an active effort not to buy leather anymore, you are doing good :)!

agreed.   What is done/over is over.   Most importantly, we just start not to buy any leather products.    It is never too late to start being a vegan or vegetarian.

Never make yourself to suit being the label, vegan/vegetarian/ovo-vegetarian/lacto-vegetarian/ovo-lacto vegetarian.

Importantly is being a HAPPY VEGETARIAN.

You are nit overreacting at all! I totally agree with you on the being one or the other! If he isnt doing the "ease into vegetarianism thing" then he should definitely make a choice! If he 'is' one now, than he should keep that gumption & go for it! Being a vegan is one of the best choices I've ever made! But if he still is having trouble IF he changes over then you can show him tasty vegetarian alternatives to those foods!

I am am Atheist but i pray to the creator when i feel bad... People can not act beyond their own state of consciousness.

Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from consumption of meat (red meatpoultry andseafood). It may also include abstention from by-products of animal slaughter, such as animal-derived rennet and gelatin.

Vegetarianism can be adopted for different reasons. Many object to eating meat out of respect for sentient life. Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, along with the concept of animal rights. Other motivations for vegetarianism include health, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic and economic. There are varieties of the diet as well: an ovo-vegetarian diet includes eggs but not dairy products, a lacto-vegetarian diet includes dairy products but not eggs, and an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet includes both eggs and dairy products. A vegan, or strict vegetarian, diet excludes all animal products, including eggs, dairy, and honey.

Dear Sara,

Eating nonveg food on and off doenot mean that particular person is 100% vegetarian..being vegetarian is all about strong determination of mind and understanding adverse effects of eating nonveg food..In my opinion abstainig from animal food all the time is vegetarianism not eating on and off..

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